• Review - Institute of Public Affairs

Publisher:
Institute of Public Affairs
Publication date:
2009-06-04
ISBN:
1030-4177
First document:
Vol. 56 Nbr. 2, June 2004
Last document:
Vol. 67 Nbr. 3, September 2015
Copyright:
COPYRIGHT TV Trade Media, Inc.<br/>COPYRIGHT GALE, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Latest documents

  • Too Australian?
  • BREATHING IN FREEDOM

    The Libertarian Mind: A Manifesto for Freedom, by David Boaz, is reviewed.

  • THE LATEST FROM THE IPA
  • NEW MONEY

    The Age of Cryptocurrency: How Bitcoin and Digital Money Are Challenging the Global Economic Order, by Paul Vigna and Michael J. Casey, is reviewed.

  • PULLING DOWN THE ANZAC

    Anzac and its Enemies: The History War on Australia's National Identity, by Mervyn F. Bendle, is reviewed.

  • BLOWING SMOKE...

    So public health advocate Simon Chapman reckons that charities that feed starving people in developing countries shouldn't accept donations from tobacco companies. In a recent piece in &quot;The Conversation&quot; Chapman pointed out that British American Tobacco South Africa had recently sent employees off to a charity called 'Stop Hunger Now' in South Africa, where they packed 200,000 meals for delivery to needy people. Chapman argues that since tobacco companies kill people, then charities who accept their donations are giving the tobacco companies good press and distracting the public's eye from this wholesale slaughter. Charities should therefore adopt the same stance taken by many universities and stop accepting donations from tobacco companies.

  • THE END OF HISTORY IN AUSTRALIAN UNIVERSITIES

    Every country has national myths and legends -- vague memories of the past that add up to a sense of national identity. For Australia, think Gallipoli, the union strikes of the 1890s, the austerity of the Great Depression, and so on. This populist historical awareness has practical consequences. How Australians understand, for instance, the causes and significance of the Great Depression has shaped how they understand the modern economy. In July 2015, the IPA released a major report, . The goal was to understand how history is understood by looking at what academic historians pass on to the next generation. While it is true that much university history teaching is about the acquisition of profession skills -- assessment of evidence, scholarly...

  • CROSSING THE LINE

    In his book People Puzzle, sociologist Morris Massey outlined a values development spectrum in which a person's core beliefs and values are developed during three distinct periods of their life. According to Massey, almost the entire crucial period in which a person's values are formed, developed, and cemented occurs when a child is at school. So when education in schools becomes less about learning the basics -- reading, writing, numeracy, critical thinking -- and more about instilling values, there is cause for concern. As at September 2015, it is clear that most of the content in the federally-mandated Australian National Curriculum is moulded to fit a certain political agenda. And by far the most concerning aspect of the National Curriculum is the controversial, government-mandated ...

  • FREE SPEECH LOST IN TRANSLATION

    Ten years ago in September 2005, the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten published twelve cartoons and sparked what the Danish prime minister described as the worst crisis in Danish foreign policy since the Second World War. In his book, The Tyranny of Silence: How One Cartoon Ignited A Global Debate on the Future of Free Speech, Danish journalist Flemming Rose compellingly outlines what happened, and what the events meant for the fight for liberty in free and unfree countries. The purpose of the cartoons was to take a position in favour of free expression, and to editorialise against self-censorship in Denmark. In 2015 political backlashes are almost instantaneous. The cycle of outrage, counter-outrage and resolution can be completed within 24 hours. Ten years ago -- that is, before socia...

  • THE SHARING ECONOMY

    is a suite of emerging software platforms acting as an intermediary between private buyers and private sellers, allowing them to share their existing resources -- hence, a sharing economy. is a market catalysed by disruptive technologies. Communication technologies have drastically reduced the costs of coordinating resources. It is now marvellously cheap and simple to discover if there's an idle car or an empty room around the corner. The disruption of highly regulated industries by companies, such as Uber and Airbnb, has roused old questions of the efficacy and role of industry regulation. Since August 2008 over 25 million guests have chosen to sleep in one of the 800,000 Airbnb listed properties. The ridesharing app Uber is signing up over 1,100...

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  • NET NEUTRALITY IS TECHNO SOCIALISM

    Net neutrality is a grab-bag of cartoonish anti-corporate populism. The introduction of net neutrality rules by the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in late February is a threat to the freedom of the Internet and its capacity for continued innovation and improvement. The key principle...

  • THE SHARING ECONOMY

    is a suite of emerging software platforms acting as an intermediary between private buyers and private sellers, allowing them to share their existing resources -- hence, a sharing economy. is a market catalysed by disruptive technologies. Communication technologies have drastically reduced the...

  • THE BATTLE OF IDEAS

    From its founding in 1943, more than any other organization in Australia, the IPA understood the relationship between economic control and political control. During the IPA's first few decades, staff went on study tours around the world, including behind the iron curtain, to investigate global...

  • NEW MONEY

    The Age of Cryptocurrency: How Bitcoin and Digital Money Are Challenging the Global Economic Order, by Paul Vigna and Michael J. Casey, is reviewed. ...

  • Growth is good

    . Growth works. True: 'growth works' doesn't sound as catchy as the first. But it's quite hard to argue against either position. Liberal governments, state and federal, are forgetting these basic truths. Since the global financial crisis struck in 2008, capitalist liberal democracy has faced a...

  • THE END OF THE EVIL EMPIRE: THE AGE OF THE AMERICAN ATLAS

    With the fall of the Berlin Wall and the end of the Cold War a quarter of a century ago, several US pundits and intellectuals proclaimed the triumph of America's mission to redeem the world. The demise of Soviet Communism and the 'evil empire' as Ronald Reagan put it, represented 'the end of...

  • AUSTRALIA -AT THECROSSROADS

    The onset of the 2008 financial crisis, Australia's economy was the envy of the world. Economic reform and fiscal responsibility had unleashed Australia's potential and the mining boom was in full swing. Six and a half years later and the outlook couldn't be more different. Continual budget...

  • MORE ENERGY PLEASE

    A speech by Robert Bryce, senior fellow with the Center for Energy Policy and the Environment and senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research in New York, addressed to the IPA for the 2014 HV Mckay Lecture, is presented. Bryce explains how increasing energy use promotes a richer...

  • THE SCIENCE DENIERS

    As Bobby Jindall -- governor of Louisiana -- said in September 2014, the real science deniers are those who deny the potential for fossil fuel energy to create good-paying jobs. The key to lifting people out of poverty and into prosperity is access to cheap energy. But then the entire climate...

  • PULLING DOWN THE ANZAC

    Anzac and its Enemies: The History War on Australia's National Identity, by Mervyn F. Bendle, is reviewed. ...