• Review - Institute of Public Affairs

Publisher:
Institute of Public Affairs
Publication date:
2009-06-04
ISBN:
1030-4177
First document:
Vol. 56 Nbr. 2, June 2004
Last document:
Vol. 67 Nbr. 3, September 2015
Copyright:
COPYRIGHT TV Trade Media, Inc.<br/>COPYRIGHT GALE, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Latest documents

  • CROSSING THE LINE

    In his book People Puzzle, sociologist Morris Massey outlined a values development spectrum in which a person's core beliefs and values are developed during three distinct periods of their life. According to Massey, almost the entire crucial period in which a person's values are formed, developed, and cemented occurs when a child is at school. So when education in schools becomes less about learning the basics -- reading, writing, numeracy, critical thinking -- and more about instilling values, there is cause for concern. As at September 2015, it is clear that most of the content in the federally-mandated Australian National Curriculum is moulded to fit a certain political agenda. And by far the most concerning aspect of the National Curriculum is the controversial, government-mandated ...

  • FREE SPEECH LOST IN TRANSLATION

    Ten years ago in September 2005, the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten published twelve cartoons and sparked what the Danish prime minister described as the worst crisis in Danish foreign policy since the Second World War. In his book, The Tyranny of Silence: How One Cartoon Ignited A Global Debate on the Future of Free Speech, Danish journalist Flemming Rose compellingly outlines what happened, and what the events meant for the fight for liberty in free and unfree countries. The purpose of the cartoons was to take a position in favour of free expression, and to editorialise against self-censorship in Denmark. In 2015 political backlashes are almost instantaneous. The cycle of outrage, counter-outrage and resolution can be completed within 24 hours. Ten years ago -- that is, before socia...

  • THE SHARING ECONOMY

    is a suite of emerging software platforms acting as an intermediary between private buyers and private sellers, allowing them to share their existing resources -- hence, a sharing economy. is a market catalysed by disruptive technologies. Communication technologies have drastically reduced the costs of coordinating resources. It is now marvellously cheap and simple to discover if there's an idle car or an empty room around the corner. The disruption of highly regulated industries by companies, such as Uber and Airbnb, has roused old questions of the efficacy and role of industry regulation. Since August 2008 over 25 million guests have chosen to sleep in one of the 800,000 Airbnb listed properties. The ridesharing app Uber is signing up over 1,100...

  • THE BEGINNING OF LIBERTARIANISM IN AUSTRALIA

    A lot happened in Australia in the summer of 1974/1975. Cyclone Tracy struck Darwin, Hobart's Tasman Bridge collapsed, Lillee and Thommo terrorised English batsmen, homegrown pop star William Shakespeare went to number one with 'My Little Angel', and Australia's first-ever avowedly libertarian political party was formed. Known as the Workers Party, it was launched at the Sydney Opera House on the Australia Day weekend. The group involved with Free Enterprise formed the core members of a working group to establish the party. This Sydney group was subsequently joined by individuals from other states, including Dr John Whiting from South Australia, Viv Forbes from Queensland, and Ron Manners from Western Australia. One of the most interesting articles about the new party was penned by the ...

  • WHEN IS FREE SPEECH FREE?

    The recent shooting at the 'Draw Mohammad' event in Texas, like the Charlie Hebdo attacks in Paris a few months earlier, raises important questions about where the limits of free speech should be drawn, or whether they should be drawn at all. Days after the attack, 3.7 million people marched in anti-terrorism rallies in Paris -- pencils were held up high symbolising freedom of speech. And yet, in the days following the march, 54 people were arrested in France for offensive speech. This debate about the limits of free speech has reignited calls in Australia for repealing laws that make it unlawful to 'offend, insult, humiliate or intimidate another person or group'. Australian Human Rights Commissioner Tim Wilson has stated that the Charlie Hebdo cartoons would not be allowed under the R...

  • THE LIFE SAVING POTENTIAL OF COAL

    Coal is the world's cheapest and most reliable source of electricity. It powered the Industrial Revolution and, together with other fossil fuels, has created an economic environment that over the last 200 years has enabled billions of people across the world to achieve a better quality of life. Between 1820 and 2011, the proportion of people living in extreme poverty decreased from over 80% of the world population to only 14.5%. In his 2015 report World Poverty, Max Roser indicates that the number of people living in extreme poverty halved between 1990 and 2011 alone. India is the world's second largest nation by way of population, and is currently undergoing a stunning electricity grid transformation. And it is coal that is making this possible. Despite India's significant progress in ...

  • KEEPING THE FAITH

    People around the world are now expecting the fight against climate change to be a central concern of the Catholic Church. But what people do not always understand is that while an encyclical is designed to provide spiritual guidance from the Pope on a particular subject, in Catholic doctrine, it is completely acceptable for Catholics to disagree with the opinions expressed in it. Pope Francis has often spoken on the need to focus on poverty and help the vulnerable. Helping the poor and the destitute is a central responsibility for any Catholic. The spread of coal to the world's poorest can only be achieved by the liberalisation of the global coal trade. China, India, and much of the global south are currently embarking on a host of free trade agreements, all designed to enhance their l...

  • FREE MARKETS AND TOLERANCE

    Economic freedom's positive contribution to tolerance is unsurprising given that the purpose of the market existence is to satisfy the unique needs and wants of diverse individual human beings. As such, the market is both tacit acknowledgement that tolerance is a necessity in human relationships and also a mechanism to facilitate it. The Enlightenment tradition assumes that trade and exchange between people and groups fosters trust, co-operation and ultimately tolerance. Furthermore, markets require trust to work. As such, the institutions that underpin markets -- the rule of law, property rights, and the enforcement of contracts -- are actually trust-protecting and trust-building institutions. It is easier to trust and tolerate a stranger if there is an effective means of recourse shou...

  • IN THE Beginning...

    The question of what is special about the Magna Carta goes to the heart of any discussion about the enduring significance of what happened at Runnymede in June 1215. The Magna Carta was not unique in European history. In the Middle Ages it was quite common for monarchs to issue charters not very different from the Magna Carta. In his book The Origins of English Individualism, Alan Macfarlane noted an intriguing difference between English land law in the Middle Ages and land law in other parts of Europe. In England, individuals owned the land, and they could buy and sell land as they wished -- all property was purchasable -- a premise contrary to law in nearly every other part of the world. In other countries, there was communal ownership of the land and significant restrictions on what ...

  • REVOLUTION OR RANT

    Revolution, by Russell Brand, is reviewed.

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  • THE BATTLE OF IDEAS

    From its founding in 1943, more than any other organization in Australia, the IPA understood the relationship between economic control and political control. During the IPA's first few decades, staff went on study tours around the world, including behind the iron curtain, to investigate global...

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    . Growth works. True: 'growth works' doesn't sound as catchy as the first. But it's quite hard to argue against either position. Liberal governments, state and federal, are forgetting these basic truths. Since the global financial crisis struck in 2008, capitalist liberal democracy has faced a...

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  • AUSTRALIA -AT THECROSSROADS

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    Ten years ago in September 2005, the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten published twelve cartoons and sparked what the Danish prime minister described as the worst crisis in Danish foreign policy since the Second World War. In his book, The Tyranny of Silence: How One Cartoon Ignited A Global Debate...

  • FREE MARKET SOLUTIONS TO INDEGINOUS POVERTY

    It is easy to be depressed by Indigenous disadvantage in Australia. On average, non-Indigenous Australians live ten years longer than Indigenous Australians. Only 30% of Indigenous adults in remote areas are employed. Worst of all, Indigenous women in the Northern Territory are 80 times more likely ...

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    Net neutrality is a grab-bag of cartoonish anti-corporate populism. The introduction of net neutrality rules by the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in late February is a threat to the freedom of the Internet and its capacity for continued innovation and improvement. The key principle...